Brown Bear 8

VideoHive Brown Bear 8 8933815
Stock Footage \ Nature
Species \ Subspecies \ Animal \ European \ America \ Largest \ Threatened

Stock Footage - Brown Bear 8 8933815
by wildlifedocumentary @ VideoHive

Stock Footage \ Nature

Animalia, Chordata, Mammalia, Carnivora, Caniformia, Ursidae, Ursus arctos. Natural real wildlife.

Bears are mammals of the family Ursidae. Bears are classified as caniforms, or doglike carnivorans, with the pinnipeds being their closest living relatives. Although only eight species of bears are extant, they are widespread, appearing in a wide variety of habitats throughout the Northern Hemisphere and partially in the Southern Hemisphere. Bears are found on the continents of North America, South America, Europe, and Asia.

Common characteristics of modern bears include large bodies with stocky legs, long snouts, shaggy hair, plantigrade paws with five nonretractile claws, and short tails. While the polar bear is mostly carnivorous, and the giant panda feeds almost entirely on bamboo, the remaining six species are omnivorous with varied diets.

With the exception of courting individuals and mothers with their young, bears are typically solitary animals. They are generally diurnal, but may be active during the night (nocturnal) or twilight (crepuscular), particularly around humans. Bears possess an excellent sense of smell and, despite their heavy build and awkward gait, are adept runners, climbers, and swimmers. In autumn, some bear species forage large amounts of fermented fruits, which affects their behaviour. Bears use shelters, such as caves and burrows, as their dens; most species occupy their dens during the winter for a long period of sleep similar to hibernation.

Bears have been hunted since prehistoric times for their meat and fur. With their tremendous physical presence and charisma, they play a prominent role in the Arts, mythology, and other cultural aspects of various human societies. In modern times, the bears’ existence has been pressured through the encroachment on their habitats and the illegal trade of bears and bear parts, including the Asian bile bear market. The IUCN lists six bear species as vulnerable or endangered, and even least concern species, such as the brown bear, are at risk of extirpation in certain countries. The poaching and international trade of these most threatened populations are prohibited, but still ongoing.

The brown bear is a large bear distributed across much of northern Eurasia and North America. Adult bears generally weigh between 100 and 635 kg. Its largest subspecies, the Kodiak bear, rivals the polar bear as the largest member of the bear family and as the largest land-based predator. The Ussuri brown bear also approaches the Kodiak brown bear in size. There are several recognized subspecies within the brown bear species. In North America, two types of the subspecies Ursus arctos horribilis are generally recognizedí¬the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies. An adult grizzly living inland in Yukon may weigh as little as 80 kg, while an adult coastal brown bear in nearby coastal Alaska living on a steady, nutritious diet of spawning salmon may weigh as much as 680 kg. The exact number of overall brown subspecies remains in debate.

While the brown bear’s range has shrunk and it has faced local extinctions, it remains listed as a least concern species by the IUCN with a total population of approximately 200,000. As of 2012, this and the American black bear are the only bear species not classified as threatened by the IUCN. However, the Californian, North African (Atlas bear), and Mexican subspecies were hunted to extinction in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and many of the southern Asian subspecies are highly endangered. The smallest subspecies, the Himalayan brown bear, is critically endangered, occupying only 2% of its former range and threatened by uncontrolled poaching for its parts. The Marsican brown bear in central Italy is believed to have a population of just 30 to 40 bears.

The brown bear’s principal range includes parts of Russia, India, China, Canada, the United States (mostly Alaska), Scandinavia and the Carpathian region (especially Romania), The brown bear is recognized as a national and state animal in several European countries. It is the most widely distributed of all bear species.

The English word “bear” comes from Old English bera and belongs to a family of names for the bear in Germanic languages that originate from an adjective meaning “brown”. In Scandinavia, the word for bear is bj?rn (or bj?rn), and is a relatively common given name for males. The use of this name is ancient and has been found mentioned in several runestone inscriptions.

The reconstructed Proto-Indo-European name of the bear is whence Sanskrit, Avestan ar?a, Greek arktos, Latin ursus, Welsh arth (whence perhaps “Arthur”), Albanian ari, Armenian (arj). Also compared is Hittite artagga-, the name of a monster or predator. In the binomial name of the brown bear, Ursus arctos, Linnaeus simply combined the Latin and Greek names.

The Proto-Indo-European word for bear, seems to have been subject to taboo deformation or replacement in some languages (as was the word for wolf, wlkwos), resulting in the use of numerous unrelated words with meanings like “brown one” (English bruin) and “honey-eater” (Slavic medved). Turkish Boz Ayi animal. Thus, some Indo-European language groups do not share the same PIE root.
Bear in the forest. Taken with a professional camera in 4k resolution.

Alpha Channel: No; Looped Video: No; Frame Rate: 25; Resolution: 3840x2160; Video Encoding: H.264; File Size: 46mb; Number of Clips: 1; Total Clip(s) Length: 0:07.

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Keywords: 4k, 4K animal, 4K Wildlife, animal, bear, black, brown bear, danger, fear, forest, fur, grizzly, predator, wild, wildlife.